Writing Topics: tautology

Tautology

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Tautology is the habit of saying the same thing more than once in slightly different ways. “Free gift” is a good example as a gift is something you don’t pay for. Breedon on the Hill in Leicestershire is more extreme as it literally means “Hill-hill on the Hill”. We all know that repetition creates emphasis, but repeated repetition, […]

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How not to write a job advert

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[This entry originally appeared on Clare Lynch’s blog, goodcopybadcopy] A reader forwarded the following job advert to me. I believe it to be genuine, so if you’re interested, let me know and I’ll put you in touch with him. Reporting directly to the CEO, and functioning as critical member of the global senior leadership team, […]

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Tautology Tuesday: “Cultural arts”

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[This entry originally appeared on Clare Lynch’s blog, goodcopybadcopy] You’d think that no one truly interested in either culture or the arts would use the tautology “cultural arts”. After all, the arts are a part of culture and culture includes a variety arts. Either “culture” or “the arts” will do – and will certainly be […]

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Tautology Tuesday: “bespoke and customised products”

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[This entry originally appeared on Clare Lynch’s blog, goodcopybadcopy] It’s not enough that you’ve bored me rigid with that overused tailoring metaphor, “bespoke”. By pairing it with “customised”, a word meaning exactly the same, you’re telling me you think I’m too dim to understand what you’re getting at.

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Tautology Tuesday: how to avoid inflation when introducing a bulleted list

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[This entry originally appeared on Clare Lynch’s blog, goodcopybadcopy] This week’s tautology is a phrase that seems to precede every bulleted list in every corporate document I come across: “include, among (or amongst) others”. (And the 2,444,000 instances of the phrase returned by a quick Google search prove that this tautology is, indeed, rife).

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Tautology Tuesday: “Working in partnership together”

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[This entry originally appeared on Clare Lynch’s blog, goodcopybadcopy] In my last post on tautology, I talked about how desperate and untrustworthy the tautological phrase “worldwide, global business” sounds. And no doubt the employees of all “worldwide, global businesses” are also committed to the equally tautological “working in partnership together”.

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Tautology Tuesday: “World-wide global business”

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[This entry originally appeared on Clare Lynch’s blog, goodcopybadcopy] Last week I launched Tautology Tuesdays, a series of posts on the repetition of the same idea in different words. In that post I pointed out that tautology can make you sound desperate and untrustworthy – like you’re trying too hard to get your point across. […]

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The annoying habit that makes business types sound desperate and untrustworthy

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[This entry originally appeared on Clare Lynch’s blog, goodcopybadcopy] You’re proud of your business and you want to tell people about it, right? So you figure the more you emphasise what’s great about your product (or service or skill) the more impact your words will have. Well not if you fall into the trap of […]

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